For gods sake get yourself some real food, or find out how to.

Supermarkets are a sure fire way to provoke some sadness and frustration at how a combination of misinformation and propaganda, poverty, biased regulation of the food economy and monopolies on our food supply have conspired to make gigantic warehouses of plastic food commodities the norm; their contents mostly devoid of anything we can quantify as proper nutrition. And this isn’t restricted to some of the more low-budget chains – high-end chains stock their fare share of shit too.

Most of the fruit and veg stocked in supermarket chains are non-organic, non-local and non-seasonal – they are dowsed in harmful pesticides and inputs that damage our soils and profoundly reduce the vitamin and phyto-nutrient profile of our food. This means they also taste bland and unappealing too and leave people profoundly unsatisfied – increasing interest and cravings for foods that are high in bad fats, sugars and salts.

‘The consequences? Widespread digestive disorders leading to widespread emotional disturbance and mental health problems. Widespread malnutrition, deficiency and degenerative conditions. Autoimmune disease and cancer. Low energy, fatigue and depression – a general toxic malaise affecting our capacity for a good and happy life and for our collective and spiritual well-being.’

Greedy purchasing by huge retail monopolies funds bad agricultural practice that employ toxic farming methods – that rob us of optimum health and a future of abundant food by destroying the soil, poisoning the water and degrading ecosystems.

Most food products that are packaged or processed contain either gluten, pasteurized dairy or sugar. Not to mention a whole host of additives and preservatives. All are toxic and allergenic and tax the body’s resources in terms of immunity and repair.

In low-budget supermarkets, a high percentage of the animal products come from questionable sources, with organic lines limited to those which can be made profitable. Most fish are farmed, where the catch are reared in giant oceanic prisons, creating vast pools of medication and pollution which are damaging our aquatic ecosystems wholesale. Livestock are reared in environments that prevent their normal behaviors and which are counter to their natural habitats – affecting their health and well-being and having untold environmental impact on their surroundings.

The goodness in most of the food found in the supermarket is destroyed before it even sits on our plate – through cooking / pasteurizing / toxic preserving and so on.

⚠️⚠️The consequences?

Widespread digestive disorders leading to widespread emotional disturbance and mental health problems. Widespread malnutrition, deficiency and degenerative conditions. Autoimmune disease and cancer. Low energy, fatigue and depression – a general toxic malaise affecting our capacity for a good and happy life and for our collective and spiritual well-being.

💥💥What are the solutions?

💡Educate yourself.

💡Eat organic whenever possible.

💡Where possible, move away from supermarkets and buy from smaller stores, grocers and stalls where you can engage the proprietor in conversation around their food ethic and sources.

💡Research local places and / or farms to buy good animal produce from farmers who encourage restorative farming practices and where animals are reared at their happiest to lift up and nourish the land. In Sussex, Plawhatch Farm is one to visit.

💡Where money allows, buy into an organic veg box scheme or switch the bulk of your shopping over to an organic wholefoods store. Re-prioritise your spending around food – cheap food is a false economy.

💡If you represent or are an employee of a local organic and wholefood retailer, perhaps ask what they are doing to ensure good food is available to everyone at a reasonable price.

💡If you’re hard up, speak to your local organic and wholefood retailer. Ask them for a regular discount for your regular patronage.

💡Join a local cooking group and learn how to cook from scratch with proper ingredients.

💡Find a chef personality or a series around cooking that you enjoy and soak up their inspiration for good food and cuisine.

💡Read anything by Michael Pollan. Read The Third Plate by Dan Barber. Read Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon.

💡Visit a naturopath, a nutritionist, a primal health coach or related practitioner to talk about your diet and your health needs. Locally to Brighton, check out Origins of Vitality, Pure People Nutrition & Allergy/Nutrient Testing & BioKitchen & Nutritional Therapy.

💡Don’t be so hard on yourself. Unless you’re doing very focused healing work through food and lifestyle changes, adopt an 80/20 rule. 80% of the time you honour your body through food choices right and healthy for you – 20% of the time, you can relax and indulge with your mates.

💡Become active in a local food partnership that brings together public and private interests in producing a better and more equitable food economy.

💡Work together with neighbours and friends to develop a buying scheme, where bulk orders of nutritious food can be attained at an affordable price for all.

💡Write to your local representatives and ask for detailed food policy and ask for action around food poverty and provision of nutritious food for everyone. Not to mention more accountability of supermarkets and food outlets in terms of buying and provision along ethical and sustainable lines.

💡Link up with current activists who are already driving an agenda around food poverty / food sovereignty / sustainable food and organic food to keep abreast of the issues and inspire your participation or own agenda.

There’s a lot of work to do.